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Posts Tagged ‘#aywmc 2018’

I’ve had a post half-written for a while inviting you to come for a walk with me, using words alone. But today I’m going to be lazy, and will take you on a very short part of that walk with my camera. This morning was bright and sunny, I felt like getting out of the house, and so I grabbed my camera, and decided to do one of the exercises from my photography course that is meant to help me become more creative. Essentially, I was to go for a walk, and take a picture every 15 steps or so, forcing me to focus on the plants, flowers, weeds and fences! Here are the results starting in my driveway and – my phone tells me – walking about 800 steps down the street, and back.

We start in my driveway, with the concrete blocks we dug up some years ago, and plan to use for a steps in the garden, before walking up to the street,

P1080912 concrete blocks cr

and the neighbours’ plants.

We then cross the road and see a sign,

P1080942 sign bw

encounter plants I can’t name, and a few weeds,

a protea

P1080961 protea

some flowers even in the depths of winter,

and a few fences.

The final fence, and the bare tree behind it, remind me that it is winter,

P1080989 fence tree

but the green cabbage tree welcoming me home is always lush and vibrant.

P1080996 cabbage tree

 

 

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On a rare morning when

a) we didn’t have anything planned/necessary to do together,
b) we didn’t have to attend to the in-laws, and
c) my husband wasn’t playing golf exercising,

I declared that the car was mine, and grabbed my camera, finally getting some time to do some photography homework. I drove to a local park that has a high concentration of native plants, and took the last carpark, worrying that it would be busy inside. I could hear children’s voices in the distance, but almost instantly, as I walked through the entrance gate, a calm descended.

Surrounded by ferns, and tall trees, I was cocooned by the green canopy. I used my senses, listening to the tui clicking and clacking and chirping, and the two kereru swooping past me, beating their wings unmistakeably. I looked at the light and shadows, playing around with my camera, working comfortably on manual thanks to my photography course, moving around to try different angles and focal lengths. I revelled in the freedom to do what I wanted, and take as long as I wanted over a particular shot, or around a particular plant, without worrying about anyone waiting for me. But most importantly, I breathed.

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