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Posts Tagged ‘travel photography’

I continue to learn about photography. Lessons I learned over the last month:

  1. Phone or camera. Whatever you have at hand is probably the best. I got this on my phone, because it was raining and I didn’t want my camera to get wet.
  1. Take a tripod. I know I should use mine more, especially for landscape photography, but knowing it is in the car is a great relief, just in case I need it.
  2. Remember that selfie stick that my niece gave me. Pop it in your handbag or backpack. All too often one of us will say, “oh, I left it in the car!”
  3. New Zealand roads often have wide verges, making it safe to pull off the road and take scenic shots.
  1. Take photos through the car windscreen if there’s nowhere to stop. Some of the pictures aren’t usable – remember to clean the windows! – but some are surprisingly clear and perfect.
  1. When Google says a particular route will take 3 ½ hours, they are not factoring in stops for roadside shots (or loo stops, or stretch-your-leg stops, or food-and-drink stops). A sign-posted 20-minute walk into the bush from the road will inevitably be longer, not because I’m a slow walker, but because I like to snap away with my camera or phone. Allow plenty of time. It gives a photographer a real sense of freedom.
  2. Take a tolerant driver/partner. Mine is happy to stop for photos, if it is convenient and safe. Most of the time. Sometimes he’ll even turn around and go back for a shot, if the road isn’t busy. In New Zealand, especially with international borders closed, most tourist roads aren’t very busy!
  3. Be decisive. Wishy-washy statements like “oh, that could be a nice shot, maybe we should …” are just annoying!  As I have been told many times. “Stop!” is a much more acceptable instruction.
  4. Know when enough is enough. (We don’t want to test #7! I was getting close when I was snapping all the autumn colours.) But don’t be left with regrets.
  5. Do a bit of research about scenic spots. Google street view was helpful a couple of times to decide where to detour. I got this pic as a result:
  1. Move. It’s one of the pieces of advice for photographers that I am worst at following. But moving to get the right composition really helps me get some of my favourite shots. Getting down on my knees, or squatting, also helps get a better shot. Scrambling down to rivers, being prepared to get wet or dirty, etc would all give me much better shots, but I am still bad at this.
  2. If you want to post photos on the move, which I do, check the photos and give them a quick edit. I import camera photos onto my phone through a camera app and my camera’s wifi, and can then edit them either with my phone software or another app. I particularly like Snapseed. But any app will allow you to crop or straighten a photo to get the shot you intended.
  3. Last but not least, ensure you take the right battery charger. I had double checked, but still accidentally picked up the wrong charger. Fortunately I discovered this error near a shop that had a good, cheap replacement that I was able to pick up the next morning. (It helped that we had an easy day of driving scheduled that day). The husband misguidedly suggested I could travel to some of our country’s most scenic destinations with just a phone for photos. Ultimately, he was very glad I ignored that suggestion.

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My most well-travelled friend loves taking opportunistic photos of wedding couples when she is in foreign climes. Her most recent shots were taken over the weekend of a wedding couple at Angkor Wat. Such a dramatic location for your wedding photos!

We also like taking the occasional photo of couples having their wedding photos taken. My husband started it many years ago, sans Mali, on his first trip to Japan. I love this shot both because the very traditionally dressed best man (?) is using a cellphone, and also because the size of the cellphone dates the picture perfectly!

A japanese wedding party in kimono and formal dress, with one member holding a brick of a cellphone

 

My favourite shot used to be this one, taken at gorgeous Polignano a Mare in Puglia, Italy. We saw a few wedding couples out for their photo shoots in Italy, including at Monopoli harbour (just down the road from Polignano a Mare) and in a sunflower field, though sadly, I can’t find that photo.

P1150277 polignano cliff bride

On this last trip, we saw a few couples posing in gardens and temples in Japan, and the beauty of their kimonos (which can cost thousands simply for the rental) and the surroundings caused both my husband and I to get out our phones/cameras. I like the ones of this couple.

And we couldn’t miss the couple in Vietnam either, stunning against the flowers of the flame trees in Hue.

P1120806

I haven’t included photos of the wedding we attended (of complete strangers) on a cliff at a resort in Fiji, or of the couples we saw getting married at Club Med in Tahiti over 20 years ago, but they were memorable. I’m sure I’ve forgotten others, but there was something special about the ones I’ve included here. It feels a little voyeuristic, but I figure that if you’re going to dress up and pose in public, then you’re fair game to become a holiday snap!

And thanks to Carolyn for inspiring this post.

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  1. I signed up for emails from a minimalist site, and it cluttered up my inbox, so I unsubscribed.
  2. Travel photos that are over-saturated in editing, and make beautiful places look completely fake. The Cinque Terre villages in Italy are frequent victims of this; compare the different photos here and see what I mean.
  3. Or travel photos and even postcards on sale that are very obviously photoshopped. You can’t believe what you see anymore, and I hate that!
  4. The dog person vs cat person divide (though I have to admit that I’m really a cat person.)
  5. Bloggers who promote their own communities by bringing in new users, but never give back by visiting other blogs, or by paying tribute to others working in the same area.
  6. Struggling to find topics for Microblog Mondays, because it’s hard to keep a post to eight sentences.

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