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Posts Tagged ‘wedding’

We came. We saw. We sweated. We gathered. Waves lapped. Sun beat down. Palms swayed. We smiled. Bartenders shook. And stirred. We drank. Fans cooled. Almost naked tourists stared. Music played. She descended. Dad proud. Mum cried. I cried too. He vowed. So did she. They kissed. We cheered. We hugged. Flowers thrown. Baby elephant Nadia arrived. Nadia kissed. Cameras clicked. Sun set. Guests swam. Dresses changed. Stars twinkled. Lanterns lit. Cocktails consumed. Speeches made. Eyes wiped. Cake cut. Dances danced. Lobster eaten. Tide advanced. Mango met sticky end. Sparklers sparkled. Boom! Fireworks enthralled. Fire dancer amazed. Moon rose. Band played. Shoes discarded. Bride glowed. Groom beamed. Moonlight shone. Surf gleamed. Palms swayed. Stars twinkled.

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It was my sister’s wedding. A happy day, a brilliantly sunny, very warm, autumn day. I had bought my outfit months earlier, from the persuasive Penny mentioned in my previous post. I bought the outfit instead of a new winter coat. Three years later I’m still looking for a decent winter coat. It was a Trelise Cooper dress and gold swing coat (no.41 on the same link as the dress). I wore it with boots, and a black top under the dress as I thought it would be too cold otherwise. But it was warm. So during lunch, after the ceremony, I shed the coat. I thought all formalities were over, but it seemed that people were invited to speak from the audience. In a case of “not me, not me” that I lost, I found myself designated to speak on behalf of my family. So I rose, and spoke, recalling the first meeting with my new brother-in-law, when we enjoyed a nice glass of wine and spoke of books. I remembered (though did not say this) how sad my sister had been before she met him, and so got teary as I welcomed him into the family, and said how happy we were that he made her happy. And then I sat down.

The rest of the afternoon went swimmingly, with good food, good wine, and good company. Then all too soon, we had to leave to catch our flight home (it was a Sunday wedding). I put my gold coat back on, and we headed for the airport. We didn’t bother changing, and so that Sunday evening we were the most glamorous people in the Auckland airport on the Air New Zealand flight to Wellington, in the Wellington airport, and in the queue for a taxi. We got home, and collapsed on the couch to relax. I put my feet up, and looked down at my dress.

“That’s odd,” I thought. “The hemline looks different.” But I couldn’t figure out why, and so I reached down. I turned the hem over, and saw the black ribbon around the gold dress, facing inwards. I looked more closely at the rest of the dress. It was inside out.

How did this happen, you might ask? Well, the dress was gold lace patchwork, see-through, beautifully tailored, with no obvious threads or seams on the wrong side. That morning, I had been in charge of trying to get my 1-year-old niece to sleep, photographing the flowers, the shoes, etc. I’d had about five minutes to get dressed. I threw my dress on, over the black slip, thrilled that it was so easy to wear, and dashed out to head to the wedding. Turns out, throwing the dress on was where I went wrong. If I’d taken twenty seconds to look myself over, I might have noticed. But I didn’t. At least I can’t be accused of being vain.

My stomach sank. I felt ill. I rewound my memories of the day, thinking about who might have noticed, thinking about speaking in front of everyone at the wedding, in an inside out dress. It took days before I admitted the truth to my husband, months till I admitted it to my oldest sister (she couldn’t stop laughing), and still more months before my newly married sister found out. In fact, I think she found out by reading my 2009 Tally post here.

Now I think about it, I should have told Trelise the story when I met her last week. I think she would have laughed.

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